Best chart I have seen this year

Marvelling at this chart:

 

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The credit ultimately goes to a Reddit user (account deleted). I first saw it in this nice piece of data journalism by my friends at System 2 (link). They linked to Visual Capitalism (link).

There are so many things on this one chart that makes me smile.

The animation. The message of the story is aging population. Average age is moving up. This uptrend is clear from the chart, as the bulge of the population pyramid is migrating up.

The trend happens to be slow, and that gives the movement a mesmerizing, soothing effect.

Other items on the chart are synced to the time evolution. The year label on the top but also the year labels on the right side of the chart, plus the counts of total population at the bottom.

OMG, it even gives me average age, and life expectancy, and how those statistics are moving up as well.

Even better, the designer adds useful context to the data: look at the names of the generations paired with the birth years.

This chart is also an example of dual axes that work. Age, birth year and current year are connected to each other, and given two of the three, the third is fixed. So even though there are two vertical axes, there is only one scale.

The only thing I'm not entirely convinced about is placing the scroll bar on the very top. It's a redundant piece that belongs to a less prominent part of the chart.


Think twice before you spiral

After Nathan at FlowingData sang praises of the following chart, a debate ensued on Twitter as others dislike it.

Nyt_spiral_covidcases

The chart was printed in an opinion column in the New York Times (link).

I have found few uses for spiral charts, and this example has not changed my mind.

The canonical time-series chart is like this:

Junkcharts_redo_nyt_covidcasesspiral_1

 

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The area chart takes no effort to understand. We can see when the peaks occurred. We notice that the current surge is already double the last peak seen a year ago.

It's instructive to trace how one gets from the simple area chart to the spiral chart.

Junkcharts_redo_nyt_covidcasesspiral_2

Step 1 is to center the area on the zero baseline, instead of having the zero baseline as the baseline. While this technique frequently makes for a more pleasant visual (because of our preference for symmetry), it actually makes it harder to see the trend over time. Effectively, any change is split in half, which is why the envelope of the area is less sharp.

Junkcharts_redo_nyt_covidcasesspiral_3

In Step 2, I massively compress the vertical scale. That's because when you plot a spiral, you are forced to fit each cycle of data into a much shorter range. Such compression causes the year on year doubling of cases to appear less dramatic. (Actually, the aspect ratio is devastated because while the vertical scale is hugely compressed, the horizontal scale is dramatically stretched out due to the curled up design)

Junkcharts_redo_nyt_covidcasesspiral_4

Step 3 may elude your attention. If you simply curl up the compressed, centered area chart, you don't get the spiral chart. The key is to ask about the radius of the spiral. As best I can tell, the radius has no meaning; it is gradually increased so that each year of data has its own "orbit". What would the change in radius translate to on our non-circular chart? It should mean that the center of the area is gradually lifted away from the zero line. On the right chart, I mimic this effect (I only measured the change in radius every 3 months so the change is more angular than displayed in the spiral chart.) The problem I have with this Step is that it serves no purpose, while it complicates cognition,

In Step 4, just curl up the object into a ball based on aligning months of the year.

Junkcharts_redo_nyt_covidcasesspiral_5

This is the point when I realized I missed a Step 2B. I carefully aligned the scales of both charts so that the 150K cases shown in the legend on the right have the same vertical representation as on the left. This exposes a severe horizontal rescaling. The length of the horizontal axis on the left chart is many times smaller than the circumference of the spiral! That's why earlier, I said one of the biggest feature of this spiral chart is that it imposes a dubious aspect ratio, that is extremely wide and extremely short.

As usual, think twice before you spiral.

 

 


Start at zero, or start at wherever

Andrew's post about start-at-zero helps me refine my own thinking on this evergreen topic.

The specific example he gave is this one:

Andrewgelman_invitezeroin

The dataset is a numeric variable (y) with values over time (x). The minimum numeric value is around 3 and the range of values is from around 3 to just above 20. His advice is "If zero is in the neighborhood, invite it in". (Link)

The rule, as usual, sounds simpler than it really is. In the discussion, Andrew highlights several considerations.

Is zero a meaningful reference value? In his example, we assume it is and so we invite zero in. But, as Andrew also says, if zero is meaningless, then recall the invitation. So context must be accounted for.

In Chapter 1 of Numbersense (link), I looked at some SAT score data of applicants to competitive colleges. Is zero a meaningful reference value for SAT scores? Someone might argue yes, since it is the theoretical minimum score that anyone could get from the test. Any statistician will likely say no, since a competitive college will have never seen an applicant submitting a score of zero, or anywhere close to zero. Thus, starting such a chart at zero inserts a lot of whitespace and draws attention to a useless insight - how far above the theoretical worst performer is someone's score.

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What about the left panel of Andrew's chart makes us uncomfortable? I ask myself this question. My answer is that the horizontal axis highlights an arbitrary value that distracts from the key patterns of the data.

As shown below, the arbitrary value is ~2.5. This is utterly meaningless.

Redo_andrewgelman_invitezeroin

What if 0 is also a meaningless value for this dataset? I'd recommend "bench the axis". Like this:

Redo_andrewgelman_benchtheaxis

An axis is a tool to help readers understand a chart. If it isn't serving a function, an axis doesn't need to be there. When I choose a line chart for time-series data, I'm drawing attention to temporal change in the numeric values, or the range of values. I'm not saying something about the values relative to some reference number.

From this example, we also see that the horizontal axis should not be regarded as a hanger for time labels. Time labels can exist by themselves.

 

 


How does the U.K. vote in the U.N.?

Through my twitter feed, I found my way to this chart, made by jamie_bio.

Jamie_bio_un_votes25032021

This is produced using R code even though it looks like a slide.

The underlying dataset concerns votes at the United Nations on various topics. Someone has already classified these topics. Jamie looked at voting blocs, specifically, countries whose votes agree most often or least often with the U.K.

If you look at his Github, this is one in a series of works he produced to hone his dataviz skills. Ultimately, I think this effort can benefit from some re-thinking. However, I also appreciate the work he has put into this.

Let's start with the things I enjoyed.

Given the dataset, I imagine the first visual one might come up with is a heatmap that shows countries in rows and topics in columns. That would work ok, as any standard chart form would but it would be a data dump that doesn't tell a story. There are almost 200 countries in the entire dataset. The countries can only be ordered in one way so if it's ordered for All Votes, it's not ordered for any of the other columns.

What Jamie attempts here is story-telling. The design leads the reader through a narrative. We start by reading the how-to-read-this box on the top left. This tells us that he's using a lunar eclipse metaphor. A full circle in blue indicates 0% agreement while a full circle in white indicates 100% agreement. The five circles signal that he's binning the agreement percentages into five discrete buckets, which helps simplify our understanding of the data.

Then, our eyes go to the circle of circles, labelled "All votes". This is roughly split in half, with the left side showing mostly blue and the right showing mostly white. That's because he's extracting the top 5 and bottom 5 countries, measured by their vote alignment with the U.K. The countries names are clearly labelled.

Next, we see the votes broken up by topics. I'm assuming not all topics are covered but six key topics are highlighted on the right half of the page.

What I appreciate about this effort is the thought process behind how to deliver a message to the audience. Selecting a specific subset that addresses a specific question. Thinning the materials in a way that doesn't throw the kitchen sink at the reader. Concocting the circular layout that presents a pleasing way of consuming the data.

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Now, let me talk about the things that need more work.

I'm not convinced that he got his message across. What is the visual telling us? Half of the cricle are aligned with the U.K. while half aren't so the U.K. sits on the fence on every issue? But this isn't the message. It's a bit of a mirage because the designer picked out the top 5 and bottom 5 countries. The top 5 are surely going to be voting almost 100% with the U.K. while the bottom 5 are surely going to be disagreeing with the U.K. a lot.

I did a quick sketch to understand the whole distribution:

Redo_junkcharts_ukvotes_overview_2

This is not intended as a show-and-tell graphic, just a useful way of exploring the dataset. You can see that Arms Race/Disarmament and Economic Development are "average" issues that have the same form as the "All issues" line. There are a small number of countries that are extremely aligned with the UK, and then about 50 countries that are aligned over 50% of the time, then the other 150 countries are within the 30 to 50% aligned. On human rights, there is less alignment. On Palestine, there is more alignment.

What the above chart shows is that the top 5 and bottom 5 countries both represent thin slithers of this distribution, which is why in the circular diagrams, there is little differentiation. The two subgroups are very far apart but within each subgroup, there is almost no variation.

Another issue is the lunar eclipse metaphor. It's hard to wrap my head around a full white circle indicating 100% agreement while a full blue circle shows 0% agreement.

In the diagrams for individual topics, the two-letter acronyms for countries are used instead of the country names. A decoder needs to be provided, or just print the full names.

 

 

 

 

 

 


To explain or to eliminate, that is the question

Today, I take a look at another project from Ray Vella's class at NYU.

Rich Get Richer Assigment 2 top

(The above image is a honeypot for "smart" algorithms that don't know how to handle image dimensions which don't fit their shadow "requirement". Human beings should proceed to the full image below.)

As explained in this post, the students visualized data about regional average incomes in a selection of countries. It turns out that remarkable differences persist in regional income disparity between countries, almost all of which are more advanced economies.

Rich Get Richer Assigment 2 Danielle Curran_1

The graphic is by Danielle Curran.

I noticed two smart decisions.

First, she came up with a different main metric for gauging regional disparity, landing on a metric that is simple to grasp.

Based on hints given on the chart, I surmised that Danielle computed the change in per-capita income in the richest and poorest regions separately for each country between 2000 and 2015. These regional income growth values are expressed in currency, not indiced. Then, she computed the ratio of these growth rates, for each country. The end result is a simple metric for each country that describes how fast income has been growing in the richest region relative to the poorest region.

One of the challenges of this dataset is the complex indexing scheme (discussed here). Carlos' solution keeps the indices but uses design to facilitate comparisons. Danielle avoids the indices altogether.

The reader is relieved of the need to make comparisons, and so can focus on differences in magnitude. We see clearly that regional disparity is by far the highest in the U.K.

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The second smart decision Danielle made is organizing the countries into clusters. She took advantage of the horizontal axis which does not encode any data. The branching structure places different clusters of countries along the axis, making it simple to navigate. The locations of these clusters are cleverly aligned to the map below.

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Danielle's effort is stronger on communications while Carlos' effort provides more information. The key is to understand who your readers are. What proportion of your readers would want to know the values for each country, each region and each year?

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A couple of suggestions

a) The reference line should be set at 1, not 0, for a ratio scale. The value of 1 happens when the richest region and the poorest region have identical per-capita incomes.

b) The vertical scale should be fixed.


Displaying convoluted indices

I reviewed another batch of projects from Ray Vella's class at NYU. The following piece by Carlos Lasso made an impression on me. There are no pyrotechnics but he made one decision that added a lot of clarity to the graphic.

The Rich get Richer - Carlos Lasso

The underlying dataset gauges the income disparity of regions within nine countries. The richest and the poorest regions are selected for each country. Two time points are shown. Altogether, there are 9x2x2 = 36 numbers.

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Let's take a deeper look at these numbers. Notice they are not in dollars, or any kind of currency, despite being about incomes. The numbers are index values, relative to 100. What does the reference level of 100 represent?

The value of 100 crosses every bar of the chart so that 100 has meaning in each country and each year. In fact, there are 18 definitions of 100 in this chart with 36 numbers, one for each country-year pair. The average national income is set to 100 for each country in each year. This is a highly convoluted indexing strategy.

The following chart is a re-visualization of the bottom part of Carlos' infographic.

Junkcharts_richricher2021_2columns

I shifted the scale of the horizontal axis. The value of zero does not hold special meaning in Carlos' chart. I subtracted 100 from the relative regional income indices, thus all regions with income above the average have positive values while those below the national average have negative values. (There are other challenges with the ratio scale, which I'll skip over in this post. The minimum value is -100 while the maximum value can be very large.)

The rescaling is not really the point of this post. To see what Carlos did, we have to look at the example shown in class. The graphic which the students were asked to improve has the following structure:

Junkcharts_richricher2021_1column

This one-column structure places four bars beside each country, grouped by year. Carlos pulled the year dimension out, and showed the same dataset in two columns.

This small change makes a great difference in ease of comprehension. Carlos' version unpacks the two key types of comparisons one might want to make: trend within a given country (horizontal comparison) and contrast between countries in a given year (vertical comparison).

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I always try to avoid convoluted indexing. The cost of using such indices is the big how-to-read-this box.


Illustrating coronavirus waves with moving images

The New York Times put out a master class in visualizing space and time data recently, in a visualization of five waves of Covid-19 that have torched the U.S. thus far (link).

Nyt_coronawaves_title

The project displays one dataset using three designs, which provides an opportunity to compare and contrast them.

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The first design - above the headline - is an animated choropleth map. This is a straightforward presentation of space and time data. The level of cases in each county is indicated by color, dividing the country into 12 levels (plus unknown). Time is run forward. The time legend plays double duty as a line chart that shows the change in the weekly rate of reported cases over the course of the pandemic. A small piece of interactivity binds the legend with the map.

Nyt_coronawaves_moviefront

(To see a screen recording of the animation, click on the image above.)

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The second design comprises six panels, snapshots that capture crucial "turning points" during the Covid-19 pandemic. The color of each county now encodes an average case rate (I hope they didn't just average the daily rates). 

Nyt_coronawaves_panelsix

The line-chart legend is gone -  it's not hard to see Winter > Fall 2020 > Summer/Fall 2021 >... so I don't think it's a big loss.

The small-multiples setup is particularly effective at facilitating comparisons: across time, and across space. It presents a story in pictures.

They may have left off 2020 following "Winter" because December to February spans both years but "Winter 2020" may do more benefit than harm here.

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The third design is a series of short films, which stands mid-way between the single animated map and the six snapshots. Each movie covers a separate window of time.

This design does a better job telling the story within each time window while it obstructs comparisons across time windows.

Nyt_coronawaves_shortfilms

The informative legend is back. This time, it's showing the static time window for each map.

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The three designs come from the same dataset. I think of them as one long movie, six snapshots, and five short films.

The one long movie is a like a data dump. It shows every number in the dataset, which is the weekly case rate for each county for a given week. All the data are streamed into a single map. It's a show piece.

As an instrument to help readers understand the patterns in the dataset, the movie falls short. Too much is going on, making it hard to focus and pick out key trends. When your eyes are everywhere, they are nowhere.

The six snapshots represent the other extreme. The graph does not move, as the time axis is reduced to six discrete time points. But this display describes the change points, and tells a story. The long movie, by contrast, invites readers to find a story.

Without motion, the small-multiples format allows us to pick out specific counties or regions and compare the case rates across time. This task is close to impossible in the long movie, as it requires freezing the movie, and jumping back and forth.

The five short films may be the best of both worlds. It retains the motion. If the time windows are chosen wisely, each short film contains a few simple patterns that can easily be discerned. For example, the third film shows how the winter wave emerged from the midwest and then walloped the whole country, spreading southward and toward the coasts.

Nyt_winterwave

(If the above gif doesn't play, click it.)

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If there is double or triple the time allocated to this project, I'd want to explore spatial clustering. I'd like to dampen the spatial noise (neighboring counties that have slightly different experiences). There is also temporal noise (fluctuations from week to week for the same county) - which can be smoothed away. I think with these statistical techniques, the "wave" feature of the pandemic may be more visible.

 

 


Surging gas prices

A reader finds this chart hard to parse:

Twitter_mta_gasprices

The chart shows the trend in gas prices in New York in the past two years.

This is a case in which the simple line chart works very well.

Junkcharts_redo_mtagasprices

I added annotations as the reasons behind the decline and rise in prices are reasonably clear. 

One should be careful when formatting dates. The legend of the original chart looks like this:

Mta_gasprices_date_legend

In the U.S., dates typically use a M/D/Y format. The above dates are ambiguous. "Aug 19" can be August 19th or August, xx19.


Asymmetry and orientation

An author in Significance claims that a single season of Premier League football without live spectators is enough to prove that the so-called home field advantage is really a live-spectator advantage.

The following chart depicts the data going back many seasons:

Significance_premierleaguehomeadvantage_chart_2

I find this bar chart challenging.

It plots the ratio of home wins to away wins using an odds scale, which is not intuitive. The odds scale (probability of success divided by probability of failure) runs from 0 to positive infinity, with 1 being a special value indicating equal odds. But all the values for which away wins exceed home wins are squeezed into the interval between 0 and 1 while the values for which home wins exceed away wins are laid out between 1 and infinity. So it's an inherently asymmetric graphic for a symmetric formula.

The section labeled "more away wins than home wins" are filled with red bars for all those seasons with positive home field advantage while the most recent season, the outlier, has a shorter bar in that section than the rest.

Here's an alternative view:

Redo_significance_premierleaguehomeawaywins_2

I have incorporated dual axes here - but both axes are different only by scaling. There are 380 games in a Premier League season so the percentage scale is just a re-expression of the counts.

 

 


The gift of small edits and subtraction

While making the chart on fertility rates (link), I came across a problem that pops up quite often, and is  ignored by most software programs.

Here is an earlier version of the chart I later discarded:

Junkcharts_redofertilitychart_2

Compare this to the version I published in the blog post:

Junkcharts_redofertilitychart_1

Aside from adding the chart title, there is one major change. I removed the empty plots from the grid. This is a visualization trick that should be called adding by subtracting. The empty scaffolding on the first chart increases our cognitive load without yielding any benefit. The whitespace brings out the message that only countries in Asia and Africa have fertility rates above 5.0. 

This is a small edit. But small edits accumulate and deliver a big impact. Bear this in mind the next time you make a chart.

 

P.S.

(1) You'd have to use a lower-level coding language to execute this small edit. Most software programs are quite rigid when it comes to making small-multiples (facet) charts.

(2) If there is a next iteration, I'd reverse the Asia and Oceania rows.