Checking the scale on a chart

Dot maps, and by extension, bubble maps are popular options for spatial data; but the scale of these maps can be deceiving. Here is an example of a poorly-scaled dot map:

Farm-Dot Density

The U.S. was primarily an agrarian economy in 1997, if you believe your eyes.

Here is a poorly-scaled bubble map:

image from junkcharts.typepad.com

New Yorkers have all become Citibikers, if you believe what you see.

Last week, I saw a nice dot map embedded inside this New York Times Graphics feature on the destruction of the Syrian city of Raqqa.

Nyt_raqqa_dotmap

Before I conclude that the destruction was broadly felt, I'd like to check the scale on the map to make sure it doesn't have the problem seen above. What is helpful here is the scale provided on the map itself.

Nty_raqqa_scale

That line segment representing a quarter mile fits about 15 dots side by side. Then, I found out that a Manhattan avenue (longer) block is roughly a quarter mile. That means the map places about 15 buildings to an avenue block. In my experience, that sounds about right: I'd imagine 15-20 buildings per block.

So I'm convinced that the designer chose an appropriate scale to display the data. It is actually true that the entire city of Raqqa was pretty much annihilated by U.S. bombs.


Lines, gridlines, reference lines, regression lines, the works

This post is part 2 of an appreciation of the chart project by Google Newslab, advised by Alberto Cairo, on the gender and racial diversity of the newsroom. Part 1 can be read here.

In the previous discussion, I left out the following scatter bubble plot.

Goog_newsrooms_gender_2

This plot is available in two versions, one for gender and one for race. The key question being asked is whether the leadership in the newsroom is more or less diverse than the rest of the staff.

The story appears to be a happy one: in many newsrooms, the leadership roughly reflects the staff in terms of gender distribution (even though both parts of the whole compare disfavorably to the gender ratio in the neighborhoods, as we saw in the previous post.)

***

Unfortunately, there are a few execution problems with this scatter plot.

First, take a look at the vertical axis labels on the right side. The labels inform the leadership axis. The mid-point showing 50-50 (parity) is emphasized with the gray band. Around the mid-point, the labels seem out of place. Typically, when the chart contains gridlines, we expect the labels to sit right around each gridline, either on top or just below the line. Here the labels occupy the middle of the space between successive gridlines. On closer inspection, the labels are correctly affixed, and the gridlines  drawn where they are supposed to be. The designer chose to show irregularly spaced labels: from the midpoint, it's a 15% jump on either side, then a 10% jump.

I find this decision confounding. It also seems as if two people have worked on these labels, as there exists two patterns: the first is "X% Leaders are Women", and second is "Y% Female." (Actually, the top and bottom labels are also inconsistent, one using "women" and the other "female".)

The horizontal axis? They left out the labels. Without labels, it is not possible to interpret the chart. Inspecting several conveniently placed data points, I figured that the labels on the six vertical gridlines should be 25%, 35%, ..., 65%, 75%, in essence the same scale as the vertical axis.

Here is the same chart with improved axis labels:

Jc_newsroomgender_1

Re-labeling serves up a new issue. The key reference line on this chart isn't the horizontal parity line: it is the 45-degree line, showing that the leadership has the same proprotion of females as the rest of the staff. In the following plot (right side), I added in the 45-degree line. Note that it is positioned awkwardly on top of the grid system. The culprit is the incompatible gridlines.

  Jc_newsroomgender_1

The solution, as shown below, is to shift the vertical gridlines by 5% so that the 45-degree line bisects every grid cell it touches.

Jc_newsroomgender_3

***

Now that we dealt with the purely visual issues, let me get to a statistical issue that's been troubling me. It's about that yellow line. It's supposed to be a regression line that runs through the points.

Does it appear biased downwards to you? It just seems that there are too many dots above and not enough below. The distance of the furthest points above also appears to be larger than that of the distant points below.

How do we know the line is not correct? Notice that the green 45-degree line goes through the point labeled "AVERAGE." That is the "average" newsroom with the average proportion of female staff and the average proportion of leadership staff. Interestingly, the average falls right on the 45-degree line.

In general, the average does not need to hit the 45-degree line. The average, however, does need to hit the regression line! (For a mathematical explanation, see here.)

Note the corresponding chart for racial diversity has it right. The yellow line does pass through the average point here:

Goog_newsrooms_race_2

 ***

In practice, how do problems seep into dataviz projects? It's the fact that you don't get to the last chart via a clean, streamlined process but that you pass through a cycle of explore-retrench-synthesize, frequently bouncing ideas between several people, and it's challenging to keep consistency!

And let me repeat my original comment about this project - the key learning here is how they took a complex dataset with many variables, broke it down into multiple parts addressing specific problems, and applied the layering principle to make each part of the project digestible.

 

 


Well-structured, interactive graphic about newsrooms

Today, I take a detailed look at one of the pieces that came out of an amazing collaboration between Alberto Cairo, and Google's News Lab. The work on diversity in U.S. newsrooms is published here. Alberto's introduction to this piece is here.

The project addresses two questions: (a) gender diversity (representation of women) in U.S. newsrooms and (b) racial diversity (representation of white vs. non-white) in U.S. newsrooms.

One of the key strengths of the project is how the complex structure of the underlying data is displayed. The design incorporates the layering principle everywhere to clarify that structure.

At the top level, the gender and race data are presented separately through the two tabs on the top left corner. Additionally, newsrooms are classified into three tiers: brand-names (illustrated with logos), "top" newsrooms, and the rest.

Goog_newsrooms_gender_1

The brand-name newsrooms are shown with logos while the reader has to click on individual bubbles to see the other newsrooms. (Presumably, the size of the bubble is the size of each newsroom.)

The horizontal scale is the proportion of males (or females), with equality positioned in the middle. The higher the proportion of male staff, the deeper is the blue. The higher the proportion of female staff, the deeper is the red. The colors are coordinated between the bubbles and the horizontal axis, which is a nice touch.

I am not feeling this color choice. The key reference level on this chart is the 50/50 split (parity), which is given the pale gray. So the attention is drawn to the edges of the chart, to those newsrooms that are the most gender-biased. I'd rather highlight the middle, celebrating those organizations with the best gender balance.

***

The red-blue color scheme unfortunately re-appeared in a subsequent chart, with a different encoding.

Goog_newsrooms_gender_4

Now, blue means a move towards parity while red indicates a move away from parity between 2001 and 2017. Gray now denotes lack of change. The horizontal scale remains the same, which is why this can cause some confusion.

Despite the colors, I like the above chart. The arrows symbolize trends. The chart delivers an insight. On average, these newsrooms are roughly 60% male with negligible improvement over 16 years.

***

Back to layering. The following chart shows that "top" newsrooms include more than just the brand-name ones.

Goog_newsrooms_gender_3

The dot plot is undervalued for showing simple trends like this. This is a good example of this use case.

While I typically recommend showing balanced axis for bipolar scale, this chart may be an exception. Moving to the right side is progress but the target sits in the middle; the goal isn't to get the dots to the far right so much of the right panel is wasted space.

 


Steel tariffs, and my new dataviz seminar

I am developing a new seminar aimed at business professionals who want to improve their ability to communicate using charts. I want any guidance to be tool-agnostic, so that attendees can implement them using Excel if that’s their main charting software. Over the 12+ years that I’ve been blogging, certain ideas keep popping up; and I have collected these motifs and organized them for the seminar. This post is about a recent chart that brings up a few of these motifs.

This chart has been making the rounds in articles about the steel tariffs.

2018.03.08steel_1

The chart shows the Top 10 nations that sell steel to the U.S., which together account for 78% of all imports. 

The chart shows a few signs of design. These things caught my eye:

  1. the pie chart on the left delivers the top-line message that 10 countries account for almost 80% of all U.S. steel imports
  2. the callout gives further information about which 10 countries and how much each nation sells to the U.S. This is a nice use of layering
  3. on the right side, progressive tints of blue indicate the respective volumes of imports

On the negative side of the ledger, the chart is marred by three small problems. Each of these problems concerns inconsistency, which creates confusion for readers.

  1. Inconsistent use of color: on the left side, the darker blue indicates lower volume while on the right side, the darker blue indicates higher volume
  2. Inconsistent coding of pie slices: on the right side, the percentages add up to 78% while the total area of the pie is 100%
  3. Inconsistent scales: the left chart carrying the top-line message is notably smaller than the right chart depicting the secondary message. Readers’ first impression is drawn to the right chart.

Easy fixes lead to the following chart:

Redo_steelimports_1

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The central idea of the new dataviz seminar is that there are many easy fixes that are often missed by the vast majority of people making Excel charts. I will present a stack of these motifs. If you're in the St. Louis area, you get to experience the seminar first. Register for a spot here.

Send this message to your friends and coworkers in the area. Also, contact me if you'd like to bring this seminar to your area.

***

I also tried the following design, which brings out some other interesting tidbits, such as that Canada and Brazil together sell the U.S. about 30% of its imported steel, the top 4 importers account for about 50% of all steel imports, etc. Color is introduced on the chart via a stylized flag coloring.

Redo_steelimports_2

 

 

 

 

 


The tech world in which everyone is below average

Laura pointed me to an infographic about tech worker salaries in major tech hubs (link).

What's wrong with this map?

Entrepreneur_techsalaries_map

The box "Global average" is doubly false. It is not global, and it is not the average!

The only non-American cities included in this survey are Toronto, Paris and London.

The only city with average salary above the "Global average" is San Francisco Bay Area. Since the Bay Area does not outweigh all other cities combined in the number of tech workers, it is impossible to get an average of $135,000.

***

Here is the second chart.

What's wrong with these lines?

Entrepreneur_techsalaries_lines

This chart frustrates the reader's expectations. The reader interprets it as a simple line chart, based on three strong hints:

  • time along the horizontal axis
  • data labels show dollar units
  • lines linking time

Each line seems to show the trend of average tech worker salary, in dollar units.

However, that isn't the designer's intention. Let's zoom in on Chicago and Denver:

Entrepreneur_techsalaries_lines2

The number $112,000 (Denver) sits below the number $107,000 (Chicago). It appears that each chart has its own scale. But that's not the case either.

For a small-multiples setup, we expect all charts should use the same scale. Even though the data labels are absolute dollar amounts, the vertical axis is on a relative scale (percent change). To make things even more complicated, the percent change is computed relative to the minimum of the three annual values, no matter which year it occurs.

Redo_entrepreneurtechsalarieslines2

That's why $106,000 (Chicago) is at the same level as $112,000 (Denver). Those are the minimum values in the respective time series. As shown above, these line charts are easier to understand if the axis is displayed in its true units of percent change.

The choice of using the minimum value as the reference level interferes with comparing one city to the next. For Chicago, the line chart tells us 2015 is about 2 percent above 2016 while 2017 is 6 percent above. For Denver, the line chart tells us that 2016 is about 2 percent above the 2015 and 2017 values. Now what's the message again?

Here I index all lines to the earliest year.

  Redo_junkcharts_entrepreneurtechsalaries_lines

In a Trifecta Checkup analysis (link), I'd be suspicious of the data. Did tech salaries in London really drop by 15-20 percent in the last three years?

 

 


Looking above the waist, dataviz style

I came across this chart on NYU's twitter feed. 

Nyu_admissions

Growth has indeed been impressive; the dataviz less so. Here's the problem with not starting the vertical scale of a column chart at zero:

Redo_nyuapplications_0

In a column chart, the heights of the columns should be proportional to the data. Here they are misaligned because an equal amount has been chopped off below 30,000 from all columns. The light purple that I layered on top of the chart presents the correct heights of the columns, assuming that the first column for 2007 indeed properly encoded the data.

The dark purple top of each column represents the "lie factor." It is the amount of exaggeration created by chopping off those legs. The lie factor is of Ed Tufte coinage.

***

The designer probably wanted to show the year-to-year trend more starkly. Doubling the number of applications in 10 years is pretty impressive. The solution is not to chop off the legs but to look above the waist. You can't fix the column chart but you can switch to a line chart, as follows:

Redo_nyuapplications

In a line chart, we are mostly concerned with the changing slope of the line segments going from year to year. The slopes encode the year-on-year growth rates. 

 


When your main attraction is noise

Peter K. asked me about this 538 chart, which is a stacked column chart in which the percentages appear to not add up to 100%. Link to the article here.

538-cox-evangelicals-1Here's my reply:

They made the columns so tall that the "rounding errors" (noise) disclosed in the footnotes became the main attraction.

***

The gap between the highest and lowest peaks looks large but mostly due to the aspect ratio. The  gap is only ~2% at the widest (101% versus 99%) so it is the rounding error disclosed below the chart.

The lesson here is to make sure you suppress the noise and accentuate your data!

 

 


Speed demon quartered and shrunk

Reader Richard K. submitted a link to Microsoft Edge's website.

Screen Shot 2017-08-09 at 10.00.08 PM

This chart uses three speedometers to tell the story that Microsoft's Edge browser is faster than Chrome or Firefox. These speedometer charts are disguised racetrack charts. Read last week's post first if you haven't.

Richard complained the visual design distorting the data. How the distortion entered the picture is a long story. Let's begin with an accurate representation of the data:

Redo_msftedge1

Next, we pull those speedometer curves straight:

Redo_msftedge2

While the three values are within 10 percent of each other, the lengths of the two shorter curves are only 40-50 percent of the length of the longest one! This massive distortion is due to not starting the axis (i.e., speedometer) at zero.

We now put the missing 25,000 back onto the chart, proportionally expanding each bar. As seen below, fixing the axis does not get us back to the desired relative lengths, so some other distorting factor is at play.

Redo_msftedge3

The culprit is that the middle speedometer is 44 percent larger than the other two. If we inflate the side bars by 44 percent, the world is made right again. Phew!

Redo_msftedge4

 

 

 


Unintentional deception of area expansion #bigdata #piechart

Someone sent me this chart via Twitter, as an example of yet another terrible pie chart. (I couldn't find that tweet anymore but thank you to the reader for submitting this.)

Uk_itsurvey_left

At first glance, this looks like a pie chart with the radius as a second dimension. But that is the wrong interpretation.

In a pie chart, we typically encode the data in the angles of the pie sectors, or equivalently, the areas of the sectors. In this special case, the angle is invariant across the slices, and the data are encoded in the radius.

Since the data are found in the radii, let's deconstruct this chart by reducing each sector to its left-side edge.

This leads to a different interpretation of the chart: it’s actually a simple bar chart, manipulated.

Redo_ukitsurvey_1

The process of the manipulation runs against what data visualization should be. It takes the bar chart (bottom right) that is easy to read, introduces slants so it becomes harder to digest (top right), and finally absorbs a distortion to go from inefficient to incompetent (left).

What is this distortion I just mentioned? When readers look at the original chart, they are not focusing on the left-side edge of each sector but they are seeing the area of each sector. The ratio of areas is not the same as the ratio of lengths. Adding purple areas to the chart seems harmless but in fact, despite applying the same angles, the designer added disproportionately more area to the larger data points compared to the smaller ones.

  Redo_ukitsurvey_2

In order to remedy this situation, the designer has to take the square root of the lengths of the edges. But of course, the simple bar chart is more effective.