Water stress served two ways

Via Alberto Cairo (whose new book How Charts Lie can be pre-ordered!), I found the Water Stress data visualization by the Washington Post. (link)

The main interest here is how they visualized the different levels of water stress across the U.S. Water stress is some metric defined by the Water Resources Institute that, to my mind, measures the demand versus supply of water. The higher the water stress, the higher the risk of experiencing droughts.

There are two ways in which the water stress data are shown: the first is a map, and the second is a bubble plot.

Wp_waterstress

This project provides a great setting to compare and contrast these chart forms.

How Data are Coded

In a map, the data are usually coded as colors. Sometimes, additional details can be coded as shades, or moire patterns within the colors. But the map form locks down a number of useful dimensions - including x and y location, size and shape. The outline map reserves all these dimensions, rendering them unavailable to encode data.

By contrast, the bubble plot admits a good number of dimensions. The key ones are the x- and y- location. Then, you can also encode data in the size of the dots, the shape, and the color of the dots.

In our map example, the colors encode the water stress level, and a moire pattern encodes "arid areas". For the scatter plot, x = daily water use, y = water stress level, grouped by magnitude, color = water stress level, size = population. (Shape is constant.)

Spatial Correlation

The map is far superior in displaying spatial correlation. It's visually obvious that the southwestern states experience higher stress levels.

This spatial knowledge is relinquished when using a bubble plot. The designer relies on the knowledge of the U.S. map in the head of the readers. It is possible to code this into one of the available dimensions, e.g. one could make x = U.S. regions, but another variable is sacrificed.

Non-contiguous Spatial Patterns

When spatial patterns are contiguous, the map functions well. Sometimes, spatial patterns are disjoint. In that case, the bubble plot, which de-emphasizes the physcial locations, can be superior. In our example, the vertical axis divides the states into five groups based on their water stress levels. Try figuring out which states are "medium to high" water stress from the map, and you'll see the difference.

Finer Geographies

The map handles finer geographical units like counties and precincts better. It's completely natural.

In the bubble plot, shifting to finer units causes the number of dots to explode. This clutters up the chart. Besides, while most (we hope) Americans know the 50 states, most of us can't recite counties or precincts. Thus, the designer can't rely on knowledge in our heads. It would be impossible to learn spatial patterns from such a chart.

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The key, as always, is to nail down your message, then select the right chart form.

 

 


Where are the Democratic donors?

I like Alberto's discussion of the attractive maps about donors to Democratic presidential candidates, produced by the New York Times (direct link).

Here is the headline map:

Nyt_demdonormaps

The message is clear: Bernie Sanders is the only candidate with nation-wide appeal. The breadth of his coverage is breath-taking. (I agree with Alberto's critique about the lack of a color scale. It's impossible to know if the counts are trivial or not.)

Bernie's coverage is so broad that his numbers overwhelm those of all other candidates except in their home bases (e.g. O'Rourke in Texas).

A remedy to this is to look at the data after removing Bernie's numbers.

Nyt_demdonormap_2

 

This pair of maps reminds me of the Sri Lanka religions map that I revisualized in this post.

Redo_srilankareligiondistricts_v2

The first two maps divide the districts into those in which one religion dominates and those in which multiple religions share the limelight. The third map then shows the second-rank religion in the mixed-religions districts.

The second map in the NYT's donor map series plots the second-rank candidate in all the precincts that Bernie Sanders lead. It's like the designer pulled off the top layer (blue: Bernie) to reveal what's underneath.

Because all of Bernie's data are removed, O'Rourke is still dominating Texas, Buttigieg in Indiana, etc. An alternative is to pull off the top layer in those pockets as well. Then, it's likely to see Bernie showing up in those areas.

The other startling observation is how small Joe Biden's presence is on these maps. This is likely because Biden relies primarily on big donors.

See here for the entire series of donor maps. See here for past discussion of New York Times's graphics.


What is a bad chart?

In the recent issue of Madolyn Smith’s Conversations with Data newsletter hosted by DataJournalism.com, she discusses “bad charts,” featuring submissions from several dataviz bloggers, including myself.

What is a “bad chart”? Based on this collection of curated "bad charts", it is not easy to nail down “bad-ness”. The common theme is the mismatch between the message intended by the designer and the message received by the reader, a classic error of communication. How such mismatch arises depends on the specific example. I am able to divide the “bad charts” into two groups: charts that are misinterpreted, and charts that are misleading.

 

Charts that are misinterpreted

The Causes of Death entry, submitted by Alberto Cairo, is a “well-designed” chart that requires “reading the story where it is inserted and the numerous caveats.” So readers may misinterpret the chart if they do not also partake the story at Our World in Data which runs over 1,500 words not including the appendix.

Ourworldindata_causesofdeath

The map of Canada, submitted by Highsoft, highlights in green the provinces where the majority of residents are members of the First Nations. The “bad” is that readers may incorrectly “infer that a sizable part of the Canadian population is First Nations.”

Highsoft_CanadaFirstNations

In these two examples, the graphic is considered adequate and yet the reader fails to glean the message intended by the designer.

 

Charts that are misleading

Two fellow bloggers, Cole Knaflic and Jon Schwabish, offer the advice to start bars at zero (here's my take on this rule). The “bad” is the distortion introduced when encoding the data into the visual elements.

The Color-blindness pictogram, submitted by Severino Ribecca, commits a similar faux pas. To compare the rates among men and women, the pictograms should use the same baseline.

Colourblindness_pictogram

In these examples, readers who correctly read the charts nonetheless leave with the wrong message. (We assume the designer does not intend to distort the data.) The readers misinterpret the data without misinterpreting the graphics.

 

Using the Trifecta Checkup

In the Trifecta Checkup framework, these problems are second-level problems, represented by the green arrows linking up the three corners. (Click here to learn more about using the Trifecta Checkup.)

Trifectacheckup_img

The visual design of the Causes of Death chart is not under question, and the intended message of the author is clearly articulated in the text. Our concern is that the reader must go outside the graphic to learn the full message. This suggests a problem related to the syncing between the visual design and the message (the QV edge).

By contrast, in the Color Blindness graphic, the data are not under question, nor is the use of pictograms. Our concern is how the data got turned into figurines. This suggests a problem related to the syncing between the data and the visual (the DV edge).

***

When you complain about a misleading chart, or a chart being misinterpreted, what do you really mean? Is it a visual design problem? a data problem? Or is it a syncing problem between two components?


Morphing small multiples to investigate Sri Lanka's religions

Earlier this month, the bombs in Sri Lanka led to some data graphics in the media, educating us on the religious tensions within the island nation. I like this effort by Reuters using small multiples to show which religions are represented in which districts of Sri Lanka (lifted from their twitter feed):

Reuters_srilanka_religiondistricts

The key to reading this map is the top legend. From there, you'll notice that many of the color blocks, especially for Muslims and Catholics are well short of 50 percent. The absence of the darkest tints of green and blue conveys important information. Looking at the blue map by itself misleads - Catholics are in the minority in every district except one. In this setup, readers are expected to compare between maps, and between map and legend.

The overall distribution at the bottom of the chart is a nice piece of context.

***

The above design isolates each religion in its own chart, and displays the spatial spheres of influence. I played around with using different ways of paneling the small multiples.

In the following graphic, the panels represent the level of dominance within each district. The first panel shows the districts in which the top religion is practiced by at least 70 percent of the population (if religions were evenly distributed across all districts, we expect 70 percent of each to be Buddhists.) The second panel shows the religions that account for 40 to 70 percent of the district's residents. By this definition, no district can appear on both the left and middle maps. This division is effective at showing districts with one dominant religion, and those that are "mixed".

In the middle panel, the displayed religion represents the top religion in a mixed district. The last panel shows the second religion in each mixed district, and these religions typically take up between 25 and 40 percent of the residents.

Redo_srilankareligiondistricts_v2

The chart shows that other than Buddhists, Hinduism is the only religion that dominates specific districts, concentrated at the northern end of the island. The districts along the east and west coasts and the "neck" are mixed with the top religion accounting for 40 to 70 percent of the residents. By assimilating the second and the third panels, the reader sees the top and the second religions in each of these mixed districts.

***

This example shows why in the Trifecta Checkup, the Visual is a separate corner from the Question and the Data. Both maps utilize the same visual design, in terms of forms and colors and so on, but they deliver different expereinces to readers by answering different questions, and cutting the data differently.

 

P.S. [5/7/2019] Corrected spelling of Hindu.


Say it thrice: a nice example of layering and story-telling

I enjoyed the New York Times's data viz showing how actively the Democratic candidates were criss-crossing the nation in the month of March (link).

It is a great example of layering the presentation, starting with an eye-catching map at the most aggregate level. The designers looped through the same dataset three times.

Nyt_candidatemap_1

This compact display packs quite a lot. We can easily identify which were the most popular states; and which candidate visited which states the most.

I noticed how they handled the legend. There is no explicit legend. The candidate names are spread around the map. The size legend is also missing, replaced by a short sentence explaining that size encodes the number of cities visited within the state. For a chart like this, having a precise size legend isn't that useful.

The next section presents the same data in a small-multiples layout. The heads are replaced by dots.

Nyt_candidatemap_2

This allows more precise comparison of one candidate to another, and one location to another.

This display has one shortcoming. If you compare the left two maps above, those for Amy Klobuchar and Beto O'Rourke, it looks like they have visited roughly similar number of cities when in fact Beto went to 42 compared to 25. Reducing the size of the dots might work.

Then, in the third visualization of the same data, the time dimension is emphasized. Lines are used to animate the daily movements of the candidates, one by one.

Nyt_candidatemap_3

Click here to see the animation.

When repetition is done right, it doesn't feel like repetition.

 


Quick example of layering

The New York Times uses layering to place the Alabama tornadoes in context. (link)

Today's wide availability of detailed data allows designers to create dense data graphics like this:

Nyt_alabamatornado_3

The graphic shows the starting and ending locations and trajectory of each tornado, as well as the wind speeds (shown in color).

Too much data slows down our understanding of the visual message. The remedy is to subtract. Here is a second graphic that focuses only on the strongest tornadoes (graded 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale):

Nyt_alabamatornado_2

Another goal of the data visualization is to place in context the tornado that hit Beauregard:

Nyt_alabamatornado_1

The area around Beauregard is not typically visited by strong tornadoes. Also, the tornadoes were strong but there have been stronger ones.

***

The designer unfolds the story in three stages. There are no knobs and sliders and arrows, and that's a beauty. It's usually not a good idea to make readers find the story themselves.


Check out the Lifespan of News project

Alberto Cairo introduces another one of his collaborations with Google, visualizing Google search data. We previously looked at other projects here.

The latest project, designed by Schema, Axios, and Google News Initiative, tracks the trending of popular news stories over time and space, and it's a great example of making sense of a huge pile of data.

The design team produced a sequence of graphics to illustrate the data. The top news stories are grouped by category, such as Politics & Elections, Violence & War, and Environment & Science, each given a distinct color maintained throughout the project.

The first chart is an area chart that looks at individual stories, and tracks the volume over time.

Lifespannews_areachart

To read this chart, you have to notice that the vertical axis measuring volume is a log scale, meaning that each tick mark up represents a 10-fold increase. Log scale is frequently used to draw far-away data closer to the middle, making it possible to see both ends of a wide distribution on the same chart. The log transformation introduces distortion deliberately. The smaller data look disproportionately large because of it.

The time scrolls automatically so that you feel a rise and fall of various news stories. It's a great way to experience the news cycle in the past year. The overlapping areas show competing news stories that shared the limelight at that point in time.

Just bear in mind that you have to mentally reverse the distortion introduced by the log scale.

***

In the second part of the project, they tackle regional patterns. Now you see a map with proportional symbols. The top story in each locality is highlighted with the color of the topic. As time flows by, the sizes of the bubbles expand and contract.

Lifespannews_bubblemap

Sometimes, the entire nation was consumed by the same story, e.g. certain obituaries. At other times, people in different regions focused on different topics.

***

In the last part of the project, they describe general shapes of the popularity curves. Most stories have one peak although certain stories like U.S. government shutdown will have multiple peaks. There is also variation in terms of how fast a story rises to the peak and how quickly it fades away.

The most interesting aspect of the project can be learned from the footnote. The data are not direct hits to the Google News stories but searches on Google. For each story, one (or more) unique search terms are matched, and only those stories are counted. A "control" is established, which is an excellent idea. The control gives meaning to those counts. The control used here is the number of searches for the generic term "Google News." Presumably this is a relatively stable number that is a proxy for general search activity. Thus, the "volume" metric is really a relative measure against this control.

 

 

 

 


Appreciating population mountains

Tim Harford tweeted about a nice project visualizing of the world's distribution of population, and wondered why he likes it so much. 

That's the question we'd love to answer on this blog! Charts make us emotional - some we love, some we hate. We like to think that designers can control those emotions, via design choices.

I also happen to like the "Population Mountains" project as well. It fits nicely into a geography class.

1. Chart Form

The key feature is to adopt a 3D column chart form, instead of the more conventional choropleth or dot density. The use of columns is particularly effective here because it is natural - cities do tend to expand vertically upwards when ever more people cramp into the same amount of surface area. 

Jc_popmount

Imagine the same chart form is used to plot the number of swimming pools per square meter. It just doesn't make the same impact. 

2. Color Scale

The designer also made judicious choices on the color scale. The discrete, 5-color scheme is a clear winner over the more conventional, continuous color scale. The designer made a deliberate choice because most software by default uses a continuous color scale for continuous data (population density per square meter).

Jc_popmount_colorscales

Also, notice that the color intervals in 5-color scale is not set uniformly because there is a power law in effect - the dense areas are orders of magnitude denser than the sparsely populated areas, and most locations are low-density. 

These decisions have a strong influence on the perception of the information: it affects the heights of the peaks, the contrasts between the highs and lows, etc. It also injects a degree of subjectivity into the data visualization exercise that some find offensive.

3. Background

The background map is stripped of unnecessary details so that the attention is focused on these "population mountains". No unnecessary labels, roads, relief, etc. This demonstrates an acute awareness of foreground/background issues.

4. Insights on the "shape" of the data 

The article makes the following comment:

What stands out is each city’s form, a unique mountain that might be like the steep peaks of lower Manhattan or the sprawling hills of suburban Atlanta. When I first saw a city in 3D, I had a feel for its population size that I had never experienced before.

I'd strike out population size and replace with population density. In theory, the sum of the areas of the columns in any given surface area gives you the "population size" but given the fluctuating heights of these columns, and the different surface areas (sprawls) of different cities, it is an Olympian task to estimate the volumes of the population mountains!

The more salient features of these mountains, most easily felt by readers, are the heights of the peak columns, the sprawl of the cities, and the general form of the mass of columns. The volume of the mountain is one of the tougher things to see. Similarly, the taller 3D columns hide what's behind them, and you'd need to spin and rotate the map to really get a good feel.

Here is the contrast between Paris and London, with comparable population sizes. You can see that the population in Paris (and by extension, France) is much more concentrated than in the U.K. This difference is a surprise to me.

Jc_popmount_parislondon

5. Sourcing

Some of the other mountains, especially those in India and China, look a bit odd to me, which leads me to wonder about the source of the data. This project has a very great set of footnotes that not only point to the source of the data but also a discussion of its limitations, including the possibility of inaccuracies in places like India and China. 

***

Check out Population Mountains!

 

 

 

 

 


Education deserts: places without schools still serve pies and story time

I very much enjoyed reading The Chronicle's article on "education deserts" in the U.S., defined as places where there are no public colleges within reach of potential students.

In particular, the data visualization deployed to illustrate the story is superb. For example, this map shows 1,500 colleges and their "catchment areas" defined as places within 60 minutes' drive.

Screenshot-2018-8-22 Who Lives in Education Deserts More People Than You Might Think 2

It does a great job walking through the logic of the analysis (even if the logic may not totally convince - more below). The areas not within reach of these 1,500 colleges are labeled "deserts". They then take Census data and look at the adult population in those deserts:

Screenshot-2018-8-22 Who Lives in Education Deserts More People Than You Might Think 4

This leads to an analysis of the racial composition of the people living in these "deserts". We now arrive at the only chart in the sequence that disappoints. It is a pair of pie charts:

Chronicle_edudesserts_pie

 The color scheme makes it hard to pair up the pie slices. The focus of the chart should be on the over or under representation of races in education deserts relative to the U.S. average. The challenge of this dataset is the coexistence of one large number, and many small numbers.

Here is one solution:

Redo_jc_chronedudesserts

***

The Chronicle made a commendable effort to describe this social issue. But the analysis has a lot of built-in assumptions. Readers should look at the following list and see if you agree with the assumptions:

  • Only public colleges are considered. This restriction requires the assumption that the private colleges pretty much serve the same areas as public colleges.
  • Only non-competitive colleges are included. Precisely, the acceptance rate must be higher than 30 percent. The underlying assumption is that the "local students" won't be interested in selective colleges. It's not clear how the 30 percent threshold was decided.
  • Colleges that are more than 60 minutes' driving distance away are considered unreachable. So the assumption is that "local students" are unwilling to drive more than 60 minutes to attend college. This raises a couple other questions: are we only looking at commuter colleges with no dormitories? Is the 60 minutes driving distance based on actual roads and traffic speeds, or some kind of simple model with stylized geometries and fixed speeds?
  • The demographic analysis is based on all adults living in the Census "blocks" that are not within 60 minutes' drive of one of those colleges. But if we are calling them "education deserts" focusing on the availability of colleges, why consider all adults, and not just adults in the college age group? One further hidden assumption here is that the lack of colleges in those regions has not caused young generations to move to areas closer to colleges. I think a map of the age distribution in the "education deserts" will be quite telling.
  • Not surprisingly, the areas classified as "education deserts" lag the rest of the nation on several key socio-economic metrics, like median income, and proportion living under the poverty line. This means those same areas could be labeled income deserts, or job deserts.

At the end of the piece, the author creates a "story time" moment. Story time is when you are served a bunch of data or analyses, and then when you are about to doze off, the analyst calls story time, and starts making conclusions that stray from the data just served!

Story time starts with the following sentence: "What would it take to make sure that distance doesn’t prevent students from obtaining a college degree? "

The analysis provided has nowhere shown that distance has prevented students from obtaining a college degree. We haven't seen anything that says that people living in the "education deserts" have fewer college degrees. We don't know that distance is the reason why people in those areas don't go to college (if true) - what about poverty? We don't know if 60 minutes is the hurdle that causes people not to go to college (if true).We know the number of adults living in those neighborhoods but not the number of potential students.

The data only showed two things: 1) which areas of the country are not within 60 minutes' driving of the subset of public colleges under consideration, 2) the number of adults living in those Census blocks.

***

So we have a case where the analysis is incomplete but the visualization of the analysis is superb. So in our Trifecta analysis, this chart poses a nice question and has nice graphics but the use of data can be improved. (Type QV)