Pies, bars and self-sufficiency
Losses trickle down while gains trickle up

Finding the hidden information behind nice-looking charts

This chart from Business Insider caught my attention recently. (link)

Bi_householdwealthchart

There are various things they did which I like. The use of color to draw a distinction between the top 3 lines and the line at the bottom - which tells the story that the bottom 50% has been left far behind. Lines being labelled directly is another nice touch. I usually like legends that sit atop the chart; in this case, I'd have just written the income groups into the line labels.

Take a closer look at the legend text, and you'd notice they struggled with describing the income percentiles.

Bi_householdwealth_legend

This is a common problem with this type of data. The top and bottom categories are easy, as it's most natural to say "top x%" and "bottom y%". By doing so, we establish two scales, one running from the top, and the other counting from the bottom - and it's a head scratcher which scale to use for the middle categories.

The designer decided to lose the "top" and "bottom" descriptors, and went with "50-90%" and "90-99%". Effectively, these follow the "bottom" scale. "50-90%" is the bottom 50 to 90 percent, which corresponds to the top 10 to 50 percent. "90-99%" is the bottom 90-99%, which corresponds to the top 1 to 10%. On this chart, since we're lumping the top three income groups, I'd go with "top 1-10%" and "top 10-50%".

***

The Business Insider chart is easy to mis-read. It appears that the second group from the top is the most well-off, and the wealth of the top group is almost 20 times that of the bottom group. Both of those statements are false. What's confusing us is that each line represents very different numbers of people. The yellow line is 50% of the population while the "top 1%" line is 1% of the population. To see what's really going on, I look at a chart showing per-capita wealth. (Just divide the data of the yellow line by 50, etc.)

Redo_bihouseholdwealth_legend

For this chart, I switched to a relative scale, using the per-capita wealth of the Bottom 50% as the reference level (100). Also, I applied a 4-period moving average to smooth the line. The data actually show that the top 1% holds much more wealth per capita than all other income segments. Around 2011, the gap between the top 1% and the rest was at its widest - the average person in the top 1% is about 3,000 times wealthier than someone in the bottom 50%.

This chart raises another question. What caused the sharp rise in the late 2000s and the subsequent decline? By 2020, the gap between the top and bottom groups is still double the size of the gap from 20 years ago. We'd need additional analyses and charts to answer this question.

***

If you are familiar with our Trifecta Checkup, the Business Insider chart is a Type D chart. The problem with it is in how the data was analyzed.

Comments

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Colin

I suspect that the spike you're seeing there is the rich recovering from the 2008 recession while the recovery of the poor took years more.

Richard Krablin

I think Colin is correct, the spike is due to a continued decline in the lower 50%, reaching a low around 2011 while the other segments were recovering and increasing.

I find the choice of segments to be very confusing. What message is intended by two middle segments of different sizes?

It appears that the original data set was available to create the relative chart. It does imply a sharp closing of the gap, albeit not yet to the 2000 level, as you note. However, I could not generate the vertical scale for per capita (meaning per household?).

Kaiser

You guys are right. Will have a post up soon which shows the relative speeds of the recovery.

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