NYT hits the trifecta with this market correction chart
Happy New Year

The ebb and flow of an effective dataviz showing the rise and fall of GE

Wsj_ebbflowGE_800A WSJ chart caught my eye the other day – I spotted someone looking at it in a coffee shop, and immediately got a hold of a copy. The chart plots the ebb and flow of GE’s revenues from the 1980s to the present.

What grabbed my attention? The less-used chart form, and the appealing but not too gaudy color scheme.

The chart presents a highly digestible view of the structure of GE’s revenues. We learn about GE’s major divisions, as well as how certain segments split from or merged with others over time. Major acquisitions and divestitures are also depicted; if these events are the main focus, the designer should find ways to make these moments stand out more.

An interesting design decision concerns the sequence of the divisions. One possible order is by increasing or decreasing importance, typically indicated by proportional revenues. This is complicated by the changing nature of the business over the decades. So financial services went from nothing to the largest division by far to almost disappearing.

The sequencing need not be data-driven; it can be design-constrained. The merging and splitting of business units are conveyed via linking arrows. Longer arrows are unsightly, and meshes of arrows are confusing.

On this chart, the long arrow pointing from the orange to the gray around 2004 feels out of place. What if the financial services block is moved to the right of the consumer block? That will significantly shorten the long arrow. It won’t create other entanglements as the media block is completely disjoint and there are no other arrows tying financial services to another division.

 

***


To improve readability, the bars are spaced out horizontally. The addition of whitespace distorts the proportionality. So, in 2001, the annotation states that financial services (orange) accounted for “about half of the revenues,” which is directly contradicted by the visual perception – readers find the orange bar to be clearly shorter than the total length of the other bars. This is a serious deficiency of the chart form but this chart conveys the "ebb and flow" very well.

Comments

The comments to this entry are closed.