« Round things, square things | Main | Is this chart rotten? »

Comments

A

In the last image, what is the point of plotting both men and women information? 4% more men is the same as 4% less women. And what is the gap then, is it 4% or 8%? If you want to plot the gap just plot the gap.

Ken

I prefer the Marimekko, but wonder if the information about the number in each group is really necessary. For a scientific publication we could just display the proportion for each group and a 95% confidence interval.

Kaiser

A: I'm pretty sure I have made that comment myself somewhere in the archives. But there is always a balance between efficiency and "entertainment". In this case, I opted to show the gap as a literal gap between two lines, feeling that it makes for a more interesting chart, without making it unreadable.

Ken: The marimekko has the advantage that the total area represents 100% of the population but whether that is important to show depends on the researcher's message.

Ken

Kaiser: I thought it wasn't important here. What would concern me is whether the proportion is reliable in the small groups, and so confidence intervals are more useful.

The comments to this entry are closed.

BOOTCAMP SUMMER '19



Link to Principal Analytics Prep

See our curriculum, instructors. Apply.
Kaiser Fung. Business analytics and data visualization expert. Author and Speaker.
Visit my website. Follow my Twitter. See my articles at Daily Beast, 538, HBR.

See my Youtube and Flickr.

Book Blog



Link to junkcharts

Graphics design by Amanda Lee

The Read



Keep in Touch

follow me on Twitter

Residues