Three good charts
Light entertainment: fruits in space

An uninformative end state

This chart cited by ZeroHedge feels like a parody. It's a bar chart that doesn't utilize the length of bars. It's a dot plot that doesn't utilize the position of dots. The range of commute times (between city centers and airports) from 18 to 111 minutes is compressed into red/yellow/green levels.

20141124_Air4

ZeroHedge got this from Bloomberg Businessweek, which has a data visualization group so this seems strange. The project called "The Airport Frustration Index" is here.

It turns out the above chart is a byproduct of interactivity. The designer illustrates the passage of time by letting lines run across the page. The imagery is that of a horse race. This experiment reminds me of the audible chart by New York Times (link).

The trick works better when the scale is in seconds, thus real time, as in the NYT chart. On the Businessweek chart, three different scales are simultaneously in motion: real time, elapsed time of the interactive element, and length of the line. Take any two airports: the amount of elapsed time between one "horse" and the other "horse" reaching the right side is not equal to the extra time needed but a fraction of it--obviously, the designer can't have readers wait, say, 10 minutes if that was the real difference in commute times!

Besides, the interactive component is responsible for the uninformative end state shown above.

***

Now, let's take a spin around the Trifecta Checkup. The question being asked is how "painful" is the commute from the city center to the airport. The data used:

Bw_commuteairport_def

Here are some issues about the data worth spending a moment of your time:

In Chapter 1 of Numbers Rule Your World (link), I review some key concepts in analyzing waiting times. The most important concept is the psychology of waiting time. Specifically, not all waiting time is created equal. Some minutes are just more painful than others.

As a simple example, there are two main reasons why Google Maps say it takes longer to get to Airport A than Airport B--distance between the city center and the airport; and congestion on the roads. If in getting to A, the car is constantly moving while in getting to B, half of the time is spent stuck in jams, then the average commuter considers the commute to B much more painful even if the two trips take the same number of physical minutes.

Thus, it is not clear that Google driving time is the right way to measure pain. One quick but incomplete fix is to introduce distance into the metric, which means looking at speed rather than time.

Another consideration is whether the "center" of all business trips coincides with the city center. In New York, for instance, I'm not sure what should be considered the "city center". If all five boroughs are considered, I heard that the geographical center is in Brooklyn. If I type "New York, NY" into Google Maps, it shows up at the World Trade Center. During rush hour, the 111 minutes for JFK would be underestimated for most commuters who are located above Canal Street.

I'd consider this effort a Type DV.

 

Comments

Mattie F.

The data for San Diego seems suspect: Googling directions "SAN to San Diego, CA" gives me 7 minutes, there's no significant rush hour traffic along that route (which is a surface arterial street with one left turn, 3 miles total) so roughly 15 minutes, and the straight-shot bus is rated at 13 minutes. I can't imagine how they could possibly have calculated 30 minutes.

Alex Lea

I'd also question grouping car and public transport data together, especially if you're discussing the 'pain' of a journey. An hour sitting on a train is arguably better than an hour sitting in rush hour traffic, constantly edging forward.

Then again, if it's a hot day and you're sitting on a train next to a screaming child...

The comments to this entry are closed.