Answering an open call
Pies fail to deliver

Some links

Daniel L. points us to the visualization of the 2010 elections by the New York Times. These are pretty good, and do a good job highlighting the most important question: how many seats are up for grabs, and which party they are leaning at the moment. I wonder if these predictions are continuously being updated -- if so, some kind of time-series chart showing the state of competition in the toss-up states would be interesting to look at.

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Quantcast_yearly  Chris P. takes the folks at Quantcast to task for an innocent looking typo. Lest you think we're nit-picking, the entire chart only contains 12 data points, so the error rate is almost 10%. And, by the way, they commit a much less forgivable error, which is to use different scales in a small multiples setting: the 17% growth on the Yearly chart is the same height as the 5.5% growth in the Quarterly chart. In any case, I'm not understanding why there are charts for  monthly, quarterly as well as yearly data.





 

 

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The headline writers at Business Insider continue to play fast and loose. Yes, the map of bubbles is classic chartjunk but how does this chart lead to their conclusion that "Americans are more caring than 99% of the world"? Pray tell.

For one thing, our neighbor has a bubble that is slightly larger than ours.

  

Giving_map
  

The chart itself is a shocker. Instead of boring you with a term paper, I just want to tell you the most counter-intuitive insight I gleaned from this chart: since the more countries there is in a continent, the more caring are its people, we should break the U.S. up into 50 entities tomorrow.


Comments

Ken

The main insight is that people who live in poverty are rarely charitable.

dan l

To be fair, laying the bubble chart out like a map is a 'neat' idea.

It fails hard. In fact, I can't think of a circumstance where that would work. Ever. But, we thank them for trying to pass the trifecta.

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