The why axis

A few weeks ago, I replied to a tweet by someone who was angered by the amount of bad graphics about coronavirus. I take a glass-half-full viewpoint: it's actually heart-warming for  dataviz designers to realize that their graphics are being read! When someone critiques your work, it is proof that they cared enough to look at it. Worse is when you publish something, and no one reacts to it.

That said, I just wasted half an hour trying to get into the head of the person who made the following:

Fox31_co_newcases edited

Longtime reader Chris P. forwarded this tweet to me, and I saw that Andrew Gelman got sent this one, too.

The chart looked harmless until you check out the vertical axis labels. It's... um... the most unusual. The best way to interpret what the designer did is to break up the chart into three components. Like this:

Redo_junkcharts_fox31cocases

The big mystery is why the designer spent the time and energy to make this mischief.

The usual suspect is fake news. The clearest sign of malintent is the huge size of the dots. Each dot spans almost the entirety of the space between gridlines.

But there is almost no fake news here. The overall trend line is intact despite the attempted distortion. The following is a superposition of an unmanipulated line (yellow) on top of the manipulated:

Redo_junkcharts_fox31cocases2

***

The next guess is incompetence. The evidence against this view is the amount of energy required to execute these changes. In Excel, it takes a lot of work. It's easier to do this in R or any programming languages with which you can design your own axis.

Even for the R coders, the easy part is to replicate the design, but the hard part is to come up with the concept in the first place!

You can't just stumble onto a design like this. So I am not convinced the designer is an idiot.

***

How much work? You have to create three separate charts, with three carefully chosen vertical scales, and then clip, merge, and sew the seam. The weirdest bit is throwing away three of the twelve axis labels and writing in three fake numbers.

Here's the recipe: (if the gif doesn't load automatically, click on it)

Fox31_co_cases_B6

Help me readers! I'm stumped. Why oh why did someone make this? What is the point?

 

 


Make your color legend better with one simple rule

The pie chart about COVID-19 worries illustrates why we should follow a basic rule of constructing color legends: order the categories in the way you expect readers to encounter them.

Here is the chart that I discussed the other day, with the data removed since they are not of concern in this post. (link)

Junkcharts_abccovidbiggestworries_sufficiency

First look at the pie chart. Like me, you probably looked at the orange or the yellow slice first, then we move clockwise around the pie.

Notice that the legend leads with the red square ("Getting It"), which is likely the last item you'll see on the chart.

This is the same chart with the legend re-ordered:

Redo_junkcharts_abcbiggestcovidworries_legend

***

Simple charts can be made better if we follow basic rules of construction. When used frequently, these rules can be made silent. I cover rules for legends as well as many other rules in this Long Read article titled "The Unspoken Conventions of Data Visualization" (link).


Graphing the economic crisis of coronavirus 2

Last week, I discussed Ray's chart that compares the S&P 500 performance in this crisis against previous crises.

A reminder:

Tcb_stockmarketindices_fourcrises

Another useful feature is the halo around the right edge of the COVID-19 line. This device directs our eyes to where he wants us to look.

In the same series, he made the following for The Conference Board (link):

TCB-COVID-19-impact-oil-prices-640

Two things I learned from this chart:

The oil market takes a much longer time to recover after crises, compared to the S&P. None of these lines reached above 100 in the first 150 days (5 months).

Just like the S&P, the current crisis is most similar in severity to the 2008 Great Recession, only worse, and currently, the price collapse in oil is quite a bit worse than in 2008.

***
The drop of oil is going to be contentious. This is a drop too many for a Tufte purist. It might as well symbolize a tear shed.

The presence of the icon tells me these lines depict the oil market without having to read text. And I approve.


When the visual runs away from the data

The pressure of the coronavirus news cycle has gotten the better of some graphics designers. Via Twitter, Mark B sent me the following chart:

Junkcharts_abccovidbiggestworries_sufficiency

I applied the self-sufficiency test to this pie chart. That's why you can't see the data which were also printed on the chart.

The idea of self-sufficiency is to test how much work the visual elements of the graphic are doing to convey its message. Look at the above chart, and guess the three values are.

Roughly speaking, all three answers are equally popular, with perhaps a little less than a third of respondents indicating "Getting It" as their biggest COVID-19 worry.

If measured, the slices represent 38%, 35% and 27%.

Now, here is the same chart with the data:

Abc_covidbiggestworries

Each number is way off! In addition, the three numbers sum to 178%.

Trifectacheckup_junkcharts_imageThis is an example of the Visual being at odds with the Data, using a Trifecta Checkup analysis. (Read about the Trifecta here.)

What the Visual is saying is not the same as what the data are saying. So the green arrow between D and V is broken.

***

This is a rather common mistake. This survey question apparently allows each respondent to select more than one answers. Whenever more than one responses are accepted, one cannot use a pie chart.

Here is a stacked bar chart that does right by the data.

Redo_junkcharts_abcbiggestcovidworries