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Roban Hultman Kramer

Your claim about credit report self correction reducing the spread in credit scores assumes that the probability of a person requesting and correcting their report is independent of their score. I would not be surprise, however, to find that in fact people with higher credit scores are much more likely to monitor and correct their reports than those with lower scores. If so, self correction could actually increase the spread of scores. The rich get richer, so to speak.


Roban: No I did not assume independence. I said "those with high scores have less incentive to inspect their data". Typically, you apply for a credit card or a loan and get rejected, then the loan provider tells you it's because of your credit score, and then you inspect the credit report. If you have a 780 credit score, there is very little reason to spend the energy to make it 790. But if you are at 580, that's a different story.

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