« Tricks of the trade 1 | Main | Peripherals 2 »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341e992c53ef00d834f4b3e753ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Peripherals 1:

Comments

Jorge Camoes

Unlike a static chart, we have multiple options regarding formatting and the overall design of a dynamic chart.

If you have to have a legend, hiding it seems to be a good option for small displays. But you must be sure that you can transfer legend content to your working memory. If there are too many series you can't memorize all the codes. Otherwise, you must leave the legend visible and of course you have a problem, because the legend overlaps the chart.

Of course the best option is to select a design that doesn't need a legend...

Peter H

"The graph designer seems to think that the most important information ... " is the legend. Hiding parts of the data to be explained. The help should help, not hinder you from using or understanding stuff.
Great Post, btw.

DStaal

When you have just asked for the legend, it _is_ the most important thing. (And since it goes away when you are done looking at it, hiding data isn't a major problem.) (Not that I wouldn't rather be able to look at both if I wanted to...)

And I disagree, slightly, that 'What's this?' should be replaced. Your suggestions for replacement, while more specific, are also jargon, and may not be readily understood by people who don't use charts regularly. The more generic English link means people who don't understand are more likely to use it, and therefore be informed. (The wording is also consistant across the Google site, making it an expected UI element that can be relied on as the 'help' link on any page, which domain-specific jargon could never be.)

Chris

This looks like a graph that people will see over and over again, so incorporating the legend every time would be a waste after the first viewing.

I would like to see what are the hottest and coolest sectors by sorting the sector names by % chg.

Kaiser

I noticed that Google has recently adopted suggestion #3. The charts are now aligned at the gainer/loser boundary. Go see for yourself!

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Marketing analytics and data visualization expert. Author and Speaker. Currently at Vimeo and NYU. See my full bio.

Book Blog



Link to junkcharts

Graphics design by Amanda Lee

The Read



Good Books

Keep in Touch

follow me on Twitter

Residues